Arthur Becker-Weidman

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: An evidence-baesd treatment

Attachment-Focused Treatment Institute

The Center for Family Development, in conjunction with a University, the Academy of Human Development in Singapore, has opened the Attachment-Focused Treatment Institute. The Institute offers three levels of certification:
Attachment-Focused Therapist
Attachment-Focused Family Therapist
Attachment-Focused Professional

The Attachment-Focused Treatment Institute was founded to provide training and certification in treatment methods based on attachment theory. Attachment-Focused Treatment includes psychotherapy, family therapy, and work by other professionals using the principles of attachment theory to guide interventions, treatment, and programs.

Certification is offered in conjunction with the Academy of Human Development, a university in Singapore, and The Center for Family Development. CEU’s are awarded through the University and the Board of Psychology, Indiana.

There are three Certifications offered: Certified Attachment-Focused Therapist, Certified Attachment-Focused Family Therapist, and Certified Attachment-Focused Professional. The Therapist Certification is for mental health providers. The Professional Certification is for residential treatment center staff, therapeutic foster carers, educators, and others who wish to use Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and Attachment-Focused Treatment methods in their work.

Certification by the Institute means that the professional has completed a comprehensive course of advanced study in the application of attachment theory and the latest advances in interpersonal neurobiology to treatment, parenting, programming, and practice.

Attachment-Focused Treatment is grounded in attachment theory, the neurobiology of interpersonal experience, and uses methods and principles from Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy.

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment that is grounded in current thinking and research on the etiology and treatment of Complex Trauma or Developmental Trauma Disorder and disorders of attachment. It is now recognized as a general approach to treatment. Treatment is primarily experiential. Teaching parents about attachment-facilitating parenting methods and the importance of attunement and responsive, sensitive parenting is essential.
STEPS TO BECOME CERTIFIED
There are two components to certification. The first is completion of the required number of approved training hours (48), which can be completed through the SKYPE Master Class. The second is the consultation component in which the applicant’s work is reviewed to assess how the material is being applied in practice.

Attachment-Focused Therapist & Attachment-Focused Family Therapist
1. Complete 48 hours of training
2. Provide evidence that you are authorized to practice in your jurisdiction, evidence of applicable insurance, singed attestation form.
3. Completion of the Consultation-Practicum: review of a minimum of six DVDs.

Attachment-Focused Professional
1. Complete 48 hours of training.
2. Letter from your supervisor approving your participation in the Institute’s certification program.
3. Completion of the Consultation-Practicum: review or observation of a minimum of four DVDs.

Certification is valid for three years. Re-certification requirements include either attending an Advanced Practice Seminar (3 hours) or having one DVD illustrating your work reviewed by a consultant.

March 29, 2012 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Special Education, Treatment, Uncategorized | , , | 1 Comment

Dr. Becker-Weidman: Key note Speaker at Annual Conference

I Will be presenting at CALO in April as their keynote speaker for their annual conference. See:
http://caloteens.com/blog/post/Professional-Conference.aspx
This is their annual conference and will be held April 12 & 13 2012

February 22, 2012 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Webinar: Complex Trauma

Assessing Complex Trauma

This workshop will describe a three session model for the assessment of Complex Trauma (aka Developmental Trauma Disorder). A brief description of what is Complex Trauma and its effects on child development and the importance of parenting will be followed by a presentation of the assessment protocol. This assessment protocol is multi-modal and uses data from records, caregivers, various psychometric instruments. Screening of the various domains of possible impairment is an essential element of this protocol.

This workshop will only be available through Webinar (instructions on how to access the Webinar will be provided upon registration)

Date: June 15th, 2012 10:00am – 11:30am

Workshop Leaders:

Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Center for Family Development

Emily Becker-Weidman, PhD, Child Study Center, New York University

To register, please complete the attached registration form and send to Maribel Cruz

(p) 212-660-1318

(f) 212-660-1319

Email: MaribelC@nyfoundling.org

Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection

27 Christopher Street, New York, NY 10014
The New York State
Chapter of American
Professional Society on the Abuse of Children
Presents
The 2011/2012
Child Abuse
Workshop Series
Co-Sponsored by
The New York Foundling
Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
Villano Conference Center
27 Christopher Street
New York, New York 10014
http://www.nyfoundling.org/fontana-center
Workshops
1. Preventing Foster Home Disruption: A Programmatic Approach
This workshop is for mental health clinicians, case planners, supervisors and administrators working in the child welfare system. The workshop will identify the risk factors that contribute to foster home disruption and describe clinical and social service interventions designed to
stabilize the foster home and prevent disruption of the foster home.
Date/Time: October 24, 2011 10:00am to 11:30am
Workshop Leader: Mel Schneiderman, Ph.D
Director of Mental Health Services
New York Foundling
Co-founder Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
2. Forensically Defensible Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations
This workshop, presented by a defense attorney, will focus on issues which arise in the context of child sexual abuse litigation including Parental Alienation “Syndrome,” the suggestibility of children, allegations of child sexual abuse in the context of divorce/custody proceedings, proper forensic interviewing, the professional ethics of mental health professionals maintaining proper records, and other issues.
Date/Time: December 5, 2011 10:00am to 12pm
Workshop Leader: Lawrence Jay Braunstein Esq.
Partner in the Firm of Braunstein & Zuckerman, Esq.
3. Common Myths and Clinical Realities of Child Maltreatment
Child abuse is the physical, sexual, emotional mistreatment or neglect of children. This
workshop will provide a multi-disciplinary forum to explore commonly held beliefs that can
often derail the process of obtaining the best outcomes for a child who has experienced any of these forms of child abuse. Through case-based discussion interspersed with brief didactics we will explore common myths as they relate to each of the forms of child maltreatment while
integrating findings from the literature in the field.
Date/Time: February 3, 2012 10am to 12pm
Workshop Leader: Ingrid Walker-Descartes, MD, MPH, FAAP
Maimonides Infants and Children’s Hospital of Brooklyn Child Abuse Pediatrician
Attending – Pediatric Ambulatory Division
Program Director – Pediatric Residency Training Program
4. Evidence-Based Mental Health Interventions for Child Abuse
This workshop will describe the current state of evidence-based mental health interventions for childhood abuse. Childhood models of PTSD and other sequelae will be described briefly. Em-pirically supported treatment for child sexual abuse, physical abuse and emotional/psychological abuse will be reviewed. Critical issues in treating youth will be described and finally national and state dissemination efforts will be noted, with focus on how New York State can adopt best prac-tices for the treatment of abused children.
Date/Time: April 2, 2012 10am to 11:30am
Workshop Leader: Komal Sharma-Patel, PhD
Assistant Director of Research
PARTNERS Program
St. John’s University
5. Integrating Prevention into Your Practice: American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children Prevention Guidelines
While much of professional practice has the objective of preventing further maltreatment, it is often difficult to understand how to best incorporate prevention activities into our work. This workshop will be hosted by a member of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children Board Prevention Task Force who will review current evidence and best practices in the child maltreatment field and discuss guidelines to assist professionals in integrating preven-tion into their work.
Date/Time: May 1, 2012 10am to 11:30am
Workshop Leader: Vincent J. Palusci, MD MS
Professor of Pediatrics at NYU School of Medicine
Child Abuse Pediatrician at the Frances L. Loeb Child
Protection and Developmental Center at Bellevue Hospital
6. Assessing Complex Trauma
This workshop will describe a three session model for the assessment of Complex Trauma (aka Developmental Trauma Disorder). A brief description of what is Complex Trauma and its effects on child development and the importance of parenting will be followed by a presentation of the assessment protocol. This assessment protocol is multi-modal and uses data from records, care-givers, various psychometric instruments. Screening of the various domains of possible impair-ment is an essential element of this protocol.
This workshop will only be available through Webinar
Date and Time to be announced
Workshop Leaders: Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D.
Center for Family Development
Emily Becker-Weidman, PhD
Child Study Center, New York University
The New York State Chapter of
American Professional Society on the
Abuse of Children
The New York State Chapter of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children provides an opportunity for professionals in New York State to meet, share ideas and experiences, develop strategies for improving
professional services to clients, influence public policy and educate the public, other professionals, and policy makers about child maltreatment.
The New York Foundling
Vincent J. Fontana Center
for Child Protection
The Fontana Center supports the mission and values of The New York Foundling by serving as the advocacy,
public policy, research, professional and community
education arm of the agency.
The Center’s mission is to eliminate child maltreatment through the identification and promotion of evidence based primary prevention and treatment strategies. To achieve this objective, The Fontana Center engages in
research, professional training, community education and advocacy.
Registration Form
Please, indicate which workshop you would like to register for below.
1._____Preventing Foster Home Disruption: A Programmatic Approach
(October 24, 2011 10:00am to 11:30am)
2. Forensically Defensible Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations
(December 5, 2011 10:00am to 12pm)
3._____Common Myths and Clinical Realities of Child Maltreatment
(February 3, 2012 10am to 12pm)
4._____Evidence-Based Mental Health Interventions for Child Abuse
(April 2, 2012 10am to 11:30am)
5. Integrating Prevention into Your Practice: APSAC Prevention Guidelines (May 1, 2012 10am to 11:30am)
6._____Assessing Complex Trauma: Webinar Only
(Date: TBA)
There is no fee for New York State APSAC members or for NY Foundling staff.
There is a $10.00 fee for all non NYS APSAC members.
Please make check payable to:
Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
All workshops will be held at the Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
at 27 Christopher Street in Manhattan.
Subway stops: West 4th (A,C, E, F, B, D, M trains) or Christopher Street (1 train)
Send check and registration form to Maribel Cruz at:
maribelc@nyfoundling.org
Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
27 Christopher Street, New York, NY 10014
Phone: 212-660-1318

February 13, 2012 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Working with Culturally diverse groups

I’ve been reading and thinking, recently, about work with culturally diverse groups and wonder if any of you do and what your experience has been.

In thinking about treatment it seems that family and DDP therapists (who are primarily European-American) may tend to:
* Allow and encourage expressing emotions freely and openly
* View each member as having a right to the member’s own unique self: to individuate from the family as a primary unit of identity
* Strive for equal division of labor among members of the family
* Consider egalitarian role relationships between spouses as preferred
* Focus on the nuclear family as the standard.
* Value a present-future time perspective

A variety of other cultures have differing values and orientations (Asian, South-Asian, Black American, First Nations/Native American, Hispanic, to name a few).

It might be interesting to have a discussion about working with culturally diverse groups…if any of us do work with such groups (I do, so that’s what prompted my readings and thinking).

February 12, 2012 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Attachment Therapy Book

I’ve just heard that a book I wrote with two colleagues,
The Attachment Therapy Companion: Key Practices for Treating Children
& Families

is now in production and should be out in early 2012. The book
describes what are the standards of care for this treatment.
From the Introduction:

This book is an important contribution to the field of trauma
treatment and attachment-focused the therapy. It provides the
clinician with a framework to assess, develop treatment plans, and
provide treatment in a comprehensive and integrated manner. College
professors are afforded a guide for classroom instruction. The book
will provide consumers with the necessary tools and information to
make better informed decisions regarding the adequacy of care they are
getting. College professors will find this book a useful adjunct for
family therapy, treatment, and ethics classes and the study guide will
assist in classroom instruction. Finally the book will provide judges,
child welfare professionals, insurance companies, and others with a
framework for evaluating proposed plans of care. It is my belief that
this book will mark a new stage in the development of attachment-
focused therapy by delineating what are the standards of care for the
treatment of attachment and trauma disorders.

November 12, 2011 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Professional Practice Manual on Attachment-Focused Treatment

Dr. Becker-Weidman is one of the editors of a new book to be published early in 2012 on the professional practice of attachment-focused therapy. The two other editors are Lois Ehrmann and Denise LeBow. The book will serve as a practice manual defining standards of care. The book will be a valuable resource for social workers, psychologists, mental health practitioners, departments of social services, child welfare organizations, judges, and attorneys. The book’s table of contents will be:
Chapter 1: Terminology and Diagnosis
Chapter 2: Purposes and Scope of Guide
Chapter 3: Overview of Attachment Theory: Synopsis of Key Concepts
CHAPTER 4: Overview of Attachment-Focused Therapy
CHAPTER 5: Core Concepts of Trauma and Trauma Focused Therapy
CHAPTER 6: Intake, Screening, & Referral
CHAPTER 7: Assessment of Children With Attachment Issues
CHAPTER 8: Treatment Planning
CHAPTER 9: Considerations in Behavior Management
CHAPTER 10: Training, Consultation, and Competency
CHAPTER 11: Ethical Considerations in Attachment Focused Therapy
CHAPTER 12: Vicarious Trauma and the Clinician’s Responsibility for Self Care
References
Glossary
Appendix A: Paper on Coercion in Treatment
Appendix B: Screening and Assessment Tools
Appendix C: Out-of Home Placements
Appendix D: Study Guide

October 23, 2011 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Special Education, Treatment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dr. Becker-Weidman in Chico California

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting a workshop, “Healing Trauma and Attachment Disorders” at two locations in Northern California Oct 14 & 15.

These learning objectives will be addressed:
 Participants will be able to describe how parent-child attachment normally develops
 Participants will identify the seven domains of impairment caused by Complex Trauma
 Participants will be able to identify three general principles of parenting & treatment grounded in attachment-theory & Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy
 Participants will be able to use two new interventions to help parents with children with trauma and attachment disorders,
 Participants will be able to describe one key element of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and be able to use it in their practice.

Please RSVP to (530) 879-3861 or ldamschroder@sierraff.org
This FREE training is made available through the collaborative efforts of Sierra Forever Families & California Department of Social Services

September 25, 2011 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Complex Trauma: A Community Approach

Dr. Becker-Weidman will be presenting an all day workshop on October 20, 2011 in Saratoga Springs.

“Complex Trauma: A Community Approach”- Implications for Treatment, Parenting, Child Welfare, Family Court and Education.”

With Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman

October 20, 2011

8:30- 5 pm.

8:00am Registration

Knights of Columbus Hall
50 Pine Road
Saratoga Springs, New York

CONFERENCE FEE
PROFESSIONALS: $95.00
All purchase orders add $15.00
PARENTS & GUARDIANS: $25.00
Due to Co-Sponsorship by the Theraplay Institute 6 CEUs are available for psychologists and play therapists

Coffee & Lunch Included

MAKE YOUR CHECK PAYABLE TO:
CCMH YOUTH CONFERENCE

MAIL TO:
Tammy Horan
Saratoga County Mental Health Center
211 Church Street
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
518-584-9030
e-mail: ythserv@yahoo.com

Name:___________________________

Agency:__________________________

Address:_________________________

________________________________

Phone:___________________________

E-Mail:__________________________

Children in the Child Welfare system have often experienced Complex Trauma and require specialized treatment, parenting and educational approaches. For over twenty-five years Dr. Becker Weidman has specialized in the treatment of families with children who have complex trauma and disorders of attachment and on training therapists, parents, children welfare workers, educators and courts
Dr. Becker- Weidman will describe Complex Trauma and Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy (DDP), which is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment, and how these approaches and concepts can integrate the community response system. Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain the effects of complex trauma on child development as well as factors affecting placement stability. The ways that teachers, child welfare professionals, parents, and therapists respond are often the key to lessening the ill effects of trauma. The community system of care must embody the principles of safety, security, support, acceptance, curiosity so that the child and family can heal. Through the use of presentations and tapes of actual sessions, Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain his approach.

Children in the Child Welfare system have often experienced Complex trauma and require specialized treatment, parenting and educational approaches. For over twenty-five years Dr. Becker Weidman has specialized in the treatment of families with children who have complex trauma and disorders of attachment and on training therapists, parents, children welfare workers, educators and courts. The material presented by Dr. Becker-Weidman will build on the presentation of Dr. Daniel Hughes her in 2009. Dr. Becker-Weidman and Dr. Hughes are close colleagues, haven written articles together and collaborate as trainers and Board members of the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Institute.
Dr. Becker- Weidman will describe Complex Trauma and dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, which is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment,how these approaches and concepts can integrate the systems of care that are involved with foster and adoptive families and their children, as well as will children with histories of abuse and neglect and attachment disorganization. Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain what Complex Trauma is, its effects on child development, factors affecting placement stability and the implications of this for teachers, child welfare professionals, parents, and therapists. The framework for this presentation will be Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, an approach grounded in Attachment Theory. Dr. Becker-Weidman’s approach within all systems of care is to provide safety, security and the necessary support so that the positive and emotionally meaningful relationships can develop. He actively communicates acceptance, curiosity and empathy. The system of care must embody these principles so that the child and family can heal. Through the use of presentations and tapes of actual sessions, Dr. Becker-Weidman will explain his approach.

About the Presenter
Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman has been training professionals, evaluating and treating families and children with trauma-attachment disorders for over thirty years. He has a PhD from the University of Maryland’s Institute for Child Study and is a Diplomat of the American Board of Psychological Specialties in Child Psychology and Forensic Psychology. He is recognized as an expert witness and frequently provides testimony in court proceedings.
Art lives in Williamsville, NY with his family and is the Director of The Center for Family Development, an internationally recognized training and treatment center. He is the author of four books: Creating Capacity for Attachment (2005/2008), Attachment Facilitating Parenting (2010), Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Casebook (2011). He is the author of many articles in professional peer-reviewed journals and empirical studies. He has published research demonstrating the efficacy and evidence-base of DDP. Dr. Becker-Weidman provides training and consultation to therapists, psychologists, social workers, and parents throughout the US, Australia, Canada, Finland, Singapore, Slovakia and the Czech Republic.

Who Should Attend?
This program is designed for anyone who would like to know how to work together across disciplines with children and families who have suffered from the effects of Complex Trauma. The conference is directed toward child-centered professionals and community systems that work to help to lessen those effects. This training will provide a perceptual framework to understand what these children and families need as well as readily implementable ideas that can be used at home, school, community, as well as in therapeutic, child welfare, and family court offices.
• Psychologists and Psychiatrists
• Social Workers/Therapists
• Family Therapists
• Play Therapists
• Parents and Caretakers
• Residential Counselors
• Teachers/School Professionals
• Adoption/Post-adoption Caseworkers
• Child Welfare Workers
• Family Court Judges
• Early Childhood Development Specialists
• Teachers/School Professionals
• Adoption/Post-adoption Caseworkers
• Child Welfare Workers
• Family Court Judges
• Early Childhood Development Specialists

Program Schedule
Introduction/Overview of Day-8:30-8:45
Complex Trauma………………..8:45-11:00
1) What is Complex Trauma?
2) 7 Domains of Impairment
3) Effects on Child Development and Behavior
4) DVD: A child’s View
BREAK……………………………..10:30-10:45
Factors affecting placement stability & Breakdown………………………11:00-11:30
Principles of effective interventions-11:30-12:00
LUNCH……………………………..12:00-1:00
Implications for Parents, Teachers, Clinicians, Child Welfare and Family Court …………………..…………………..1:00-5:00
Teachers……………………… ….1:00-2:00
Class and School Practices
Child Welfare and Family Court-2:00-3:00
Placement Policies/Court Issues
Foster Parent Selection & Training
BREAK………………………………..3:00-3:15
Treatment……………………………3:15-4:00
Elements of treatment Parenting
…………….………………………….4:00-5:00
Attachment Facilitating Parenting

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Tammy Horan
518-584-9030
conferenceythserv@yahoo.com
DIRECTIONS:
From I-87 take Exit 13N, merge onto US-9
toward Saratoga Springs
4.4m turn left onto Washington St. /NY 29
(Corner with Starbucks)
1.5 m turn left onto Pine Rd
Left into Parking Lot.
50 Pine Rd.
Knights of Columbus Hall

September 8, 2011 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Adoption & Mental Health Status

The National Institutes of Health released a report this week stating “adopted children have higher rates of mental health problems than all other children.”

For those of us in the adoption world, the report — the 15th in a series issued since 1997 by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics – may state the obvious. But it is also throws a gauntlet at the feet of social service agencies and policy makers.

During the past twenty years, the adoption landscape has been radically transformed. From the secretive adoption of babies born to unwed and predominantly white mothers, the norm today is arranged, open adoption of newborns, children from foster care or children from institutions and orphanages in far flung parts of the world.

Recent statistics help put this shift into perspective. Out of the approximately 135,000 children adopted in the U.S. last year, 11,000 (most between the ages of one and two) were internationally adopted. Here in the U.S. just over 52,000 children were adopted into non-family member homes from foster care.

Adam Pertman, Executive Director of the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute, and author of Adoption Nation (Basic Books, Perseus Book Group, 2000) said in an interview that, “many adopted kids today enter their new families with pre-adoption lives. For them, this means they’ve experienced abuse, neglect, or [if from an inter-country placement] institutionalization.”

Older parents who can’t have their own children are a key factor driving the demand for more international and foster care adoptions. Not only are these new adoptive families not genetically linked, many parents, like myself, don’t even know the genetic history of the children we end up calling our own.

The upside to this expanded adoption domain has been a tremendous surge in diversity. Parents don’t try and adopt children that look like them nor do they demand infants. The linear homogenous family model is out and the crazy quilt is in. The downside, though, is inadequate support to help parents understand the history of their child or to help prepare these families for potential difficulties, both behavioral and cognitive. In their giddy rush to form a family, naïve parents can be blindsided when confronted by the reality of their adopted child’s extreme needs. To help theses parents cope, an industry of medical, cultural and emotional support services have emerged.

Nothing could underscore the point more clearly than the return in April 2010 of adoptee Artyom Savalyev to his native Russia. His single mother, Torry Hansen, allegedly overwhelmed by seven-year old Atryom’s unpredictable and unstable behavior, determined she could no longer parent him. Instead, Hansen sent her son back on a plane to Russia, by himself, with a note pinned inside his jacket. Artyom remains in Russia at an undisclosed location while the case against Hansen languishes in limbo.

Dr. Lisa Albers Prock, a Developmental Behavioral Pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Boston, and a leading advocate of ‘adoption medicine,’ says she tries to prepare parents for what to expect, but it’s hard, she says, for anxious new parents to grasp the complexities of “kids that have been fully programmed and have to be reprogrammed” in a new setting.

The new NIH report highlights some of the realities on the ground. Of the families surveyed, almost 30 percent of adopted children had moderate to severe health problems and foster care children were the most susceptible. In addition to health problems, many of these children also had an assortment of cognitive deficits such as learning disabilities, ADD and ADHD, or behavior and conduct disorders. Exposure to alcohol or drugs during pregnancy is often thought to be the culprit behind these deficits, as is infant trauma, which can have serious and long-lasting implications later in life.

While this data is distressing, Pertman says reports like this are “helpful and a good wake-up call.” To Pertman, these findings demand that policy makers take notice. The once mandatory emphasis on placement should now shift, he says, “to looking at how to help these kids and families succeed.” The NIH findings also coincide with his Institute’s most recent policy and practice report on the need for post-adoption services.

The NIH report demonstrates families feel challenged. But instead of retreating or giving up, these parents are demanding help. Despite the old Beatles refrain, “Love is all you need,” sometimes you also need a safety net.

July 27, 2011 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Executive Director of ATTACh

ATTACh, the Association for Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children, an international coalition of professionals and families dedicated to helping those with attachment difficulties by sharing our knowledge, talents and resources is seeking a dynamic leader to serve as it’s Executive Director. Our vision is to be an international leader in creating public awareness and education regarding attachment and the critical role it plays in human development. We provide an annual conference, educational programs, advocacy, community building, a membership directory, and other benefits to our members and the public. We are seeking an experienced professional to work in a collaborative community environment, building relationships and serving as a leader of a diverse team of professionals and parents. Experience in community organization, fundraising, business development ,budget planning, administration, and personnel management is required. Knowledge of information systems, research and legal issues is highly desirable. Experience in attachment, trauma, or related fields is strongly preferred. This position requires strong analytical, creative thinking and problem-solving abilities. A balance of assertiveness and diplomacy is critical, as well as effective listening skills and excellent verbal and written communications skills. Experience with MS Office (Word, Excel and Access) is essential.

Master’s Degree in Human Services, Business, Social Services or related degree is required, with a minimum of five years of progressively responsible combined experience in first line and/or second line management/administration of a non-profit organization.

Geographic location of position within USA is negotiable. Please send cover letter, salary requirements and resume to search committee at email listed above.

Compensation: salary negotiable
Telecommuting is ok.
This is at a non-profit organization.
Principals only. Recruiters, please don’t contact this job poster.
Please, no phone calls about this job!
Please do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests.

The email for this is Dynamicleaderforattach@gmail.com.

July 22, 2011 Posted by | Arthur Becker-Weidman, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, International Adoption, Psychology | Leave a comment