Arthur Becker-Weidman

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: An evidence-baesd treatment

Webinar: Complex Trauma

Assessing Complex Trauma

This workshop will describe a three session model for the assessment of Complex Trauma (aka Developmental Trauma Disorder). A brief description of what is Complex Trauma and its effects on child development and the importance of parenting will be followed by a presentation of the assessment protocol. This assessment protocol is multi-modal and uses data from records, caregivers, various psychometric instruments. Screening of the various domains of possible impairment is an essential element of this protocol.

This workshop will only be available through Webinar (instructions on how to access the Webinar will be provided upon registration)

Date: June 15th, 2012 10:00am – 11:30am

Workshop Leaders:

Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Center for Family Development

Emily Becker-Weidman, PhD, Child Study Center, New York University

To register, please complete the attached registration form and send to Maribel Cruz

(p) 212-660-1318

(f) 212-660-1319

Email: MaribelC@nyfoundling.org

Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection

27 Christopher Street, New York, NY 10014
The New York State
Chapter of American
Professional Society on the Abuse of Children
Presents
The 2011/2012
Child Abuse
Workshop Series
Co-Sponsored by
The New York Foundling
Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
Villano Conference Center
27 Christopher Street
New York, New York 10014
http://www.nyfoundling.org/fontana-center
Workshops
1. Preventing Foster Home Disruption: A Programmatic Approach
This workshop is for mental health clinicians, case planners, supervisors and administrators working in the child welfare system. The workshop will identify the risk factors that contribute to foster home disruption and describe clinical and social service interventions designed to
stabilize the foster home and prevent disruption of the foster home.
Date/Time: October 24, 2011 10:00am to 11:30am
Workshop Leader: Mel Schneiderman, Ph.D
Director of Mental Health Services
New York Foundling
Co-founder Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
2. Forensically Defensible Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations
This workshop, presented by a defense attorney, will focus on issues which arise in the context of child sexual abuse litigation including Parental Alienation “Syndrome,” the suggestibility of children, allegations of child sexual abuse in the context of divorce/custody proceedings, proper forensic interviewing, the professional ethics of mental health professionals maintaining proper records, and other issues.
Date/Time: December 5, 2011 10:00am to 12pm
Workshop Leader: Lawrence Jay Braunstein Esq.
Partner in the Firm of Braunstein & Zuckerman, Esq.
3. Common Myths and Clinical Realities of Child Maltreatment
Child abuse is the physical, sexual, emotional mistreatment or neglect of children. This
workshop will provide a multi-disciplinary forum to explore commonly held beliefs that can
often derail the process of obtaining the best outcomes for a child who has experienced any of these forms of child abuse. Through case-based discussion interspersed with brief didactics we will explore common myths as they relate to each of the forms of child maltreatment while
integrating findings from the literature in the field.
Date/Time: February 3, 2012 10am to 12pm
Workshop Leader: Ingrid Walker-Descartes, MD, MPH, FAAP
Maimonides Infants and Children’s Hospital of Brooklyn Child Abuse Pediatrician
Attending – Pediatric Ambulatory Division
Program Director – Pediatric Residency Training Program
4. Evidence-Based Mental Health Interventions for Child Abuse
This workshop will describe the current state of evidence-based mental health interventions for childhood abuse. Childhood models of PTSD and other sequelae will be described briefly. Em-pirically supported treatment for child sexual abuse, physical abuse and emotional/psychological abuse will be reviewed. Critical issues in treating youth will be described and finally national and state dissemination efforts will be noted, with focus on how New York State can adopt best prac-tices for the treatment of abused children.
Date/Time: April 2, 2012 10am to 11:30am
Workshop Leader: Komal Sharma-Patel, PhD
Assistant Director of Research
PARTNERS Program
St. John’s University
5. Integrating Prevention into Your Practice: American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children Prevention Guidelines
While much of professional practice has the objective of preventing further maltreatment, it is often difficult to understand how to best incorporate prevention activities into our work. This workshop will be hosted by a member of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children Board Prevention Task Force who will review current evidence and best practices in the child maltreatment field and discuss guidelines to assist professionals in integrating preven-tion into their work.
Date/Time: May 1, 2012 10am to 11:30am
Workshop Leader: Vincent J. Palusci, MD MS
Professor of Pediatrics at NYU School of Medicine
Child Abuse Pediatrician at the Frances L. Loeb Child
Protection and Developmental Center at Bellevue Hospital
6. Assessing Complex Trauma
This workshop will describe a three session model for the assessment of Complex Trauma (aka Developmental Trauma Disorder). A brief description of what is Complex Trauma and its effects on child development and the importance of parenting will be followed by a presentation of the assessment protocol. This assessment protocol is multi-modal and uses data from records, care-givers, various psychometric instruments. Screening of the various domains of possible impair-ment is an essential element of this protocol.
This workshop will only be available through Webinar
Date and Time to be announced
Workshop Leaders: Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D.
Center for Family Development
Emily Becker-Weidman, PhD
Child Study Center, New York University
The New York State Chapter of
American Professional Society on the
Abuse of Children
The New York State Chapter of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children provides an opportunity for professionals in New York State to meet, share ideas and experiences, develop strategies for improving
professional services to clients, influence public policy and educate the public, other professionals, and policy makers about child maltreatment.
The New York Foundling
Vincent J. Fontana Center
for Child Protection
The Fontana Center supports the mission and values of The New York Foundling by serving as the advocacy,
public policy, research, professional and community
education arm of the agency.
The Center’s mission is to eliminate child maltreatment through the identification and promotion of evidence based primary prevention and treatment strategies. To achieve this objective, The Fontana Center engages in
research, professional training, community education and advocacy.
Registration Form
Please, indicate which workshop you would like to register for below.
1._____Preventing Foster Home Disruption: A Programmatic Approach
(October 24, 2011 10:00am to 11:30am)
2. Forensically Defensible Child Sexual Abuse Evaluations
(December 5, 2011 10:00am to 12pm)
3._____Common Myths and Clinical Realities of Child Maltreatment
(February 3, 2012 10am to 12pm)
4._____Evidence-Based Mental Health Interventions for Child Abuse
(April 2, 2012 10am to 11:30am)
5. Integrating Prevention into Your Practice: APSAC Prevention Guidelines (May 1, 2012 10am to 11:30am)
6._____Assessing Complex Trauma: Webinar Only
(Date: TBA)
There is no fee for New York State APSAC members or for NY Foundling staff.
There is a $10.00 fee for all non NYS APSAC members.
Please make check payable to:
Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
All workshops will be held at the Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
at 27 Christopher Street in Manhattan.
Subway stops: West 4th (A,C, E, F, B, D, M trains) or Christopher Street (1 train)
Send check and registration form to Maribel Cruz at:
maribelc@nyfoundling.org
Vincent J. Fontana Center for Child Protection
27 Christopher Street, New York, NY 10014
Phone: 212-660-1318

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February 13, 2012 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy training

ABOUT THE WORKSHOP
The workshop covers all the “Required Core Training Content” necessary to enter the practicum to become a Certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy therapist. The use of SKYPE, independent study, and consultations will allow remote participants to fulfill the requirements to become Certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy therapists.

The workshop uses a combination of SKYPE sessions, group discussion, independent study, and case presentations. Attachment-focused family therapy workbook, is the course text.

Early deprivation, neglect, abuse, significant early health problems and hospitalizations, repeated moves, or more than one year in an orphanage can create attachment problems that require specialized treatment. Traditional forms of therapy are ineffective with attachment-disordered children. This workshop will provide the therapist and other professionals with an opportunity to learn and practice effective treatment methods for trauma-attachment disordered children.

Participants are encouraged to present videotapes of sessions.

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment that is grounded in current thinking and research on the etiology and treatment of Complex Trauma or Developmental Trauma Disorder and disorders of attachment. Treatment is primarily experiential and there is an important teaching element as well. Teaching parents about attachment-facilitating parenting methods and the importance of attunement and responsive, sensitive parenting is essential. Direct work with the parents regarding their own family or origin issues is another component of treatment. Finally, intensive emotional work with the child in a manner consistent with sound treatment principles is vital.

The workshop is led by Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, who is a certified Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapist, Certified Consultant, and Certified Trainer by the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Institute.
CENTER FOR FAMILY DEVELOPMENT
The Center For Family Development is an internationally recognized treatment and training center specializing in helping adopted and foster families with trauma and attachment disordered children. The Center is a registered agency with the Association for Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children.

Arthur Becker-Weidman, CSW-R Ph.D. received his doctorate in Human Development from the University of Maryland, Institute for Child Study. He achieved Diplomate status from the American Board of Psychological Specialties in Child Psychology and Forensic Psychology. He is a Vice-President, clinical, with the Association for the Treatment and Training in the Attachment of Children and President of the Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Institute. Art is an adjunct Clinical Professor at SUNY at Buffalo. He has published over a dozen scholarly papers and regularly presents at international and national conferences. Art consults with psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists and several child treatment agencies, school districts, departments of social services, and governments in the United States, Canada, Finland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Singapore, & Australia.

EVIDENCE-BASIS FOR TREATMENT
* Becker-Weidman, A., (2006) “Treatment for Children with Trauma-Attachment Disorders: Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy,” Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal. Vol. 23(2), 147-171.
* Becker-Weidman, A., (2006) “Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: A multi-year Follow-up,” in, New Developments In Child Abuse Research, Stanley M. Sturt, Ph.D. (Ed.) Nova Science Publishers, NY, pp. 43 – 61.
* Becker-Weidman, A., (2007). “Treatment For Children with Reactive Attachment Disorder: Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy,” http://www.center4familydevelop.com/research.pdf
* Becker-Weidman, A., & Hughes, D., (2008) “Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: An evidence-based treatment for children with complex trauma and disorders of attachment,” Child & Adolescent Social Work, 13, pp.329-337.
* Craven, P., & Lee, R., (2006) Therapeutic Interventions for Foster Children: A Systematic Research Synthesis, Research on Social Work Practice, 16(3):287-304.
TRAINING OUTLINE
2012
Center For Family Development
5820 Main Street, suite 406
Williamsville, NY 14221

SCHEDULE
A Six-month 56-hour Master Class.
10:00 am– 5:00 pm, 1/20/12, 2/17, 3.16, 4/20, 5/18, 6/21. Dates subject to change based on participant requests, 2012 holidays, and group agreement. Limited to eight.

OUTLINE
* Patterns of attachment
* Engaging and working with parents
* Intersubjectivity & use of self in practice
* Experiential components of training
* Components of Practice
* Phases of Treatment
* Differential use of components of
* Practice in different phases of
treatment
* Treatment with different populations and
circumstances
* Experiential components of training
* Consultation

Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy is an evidence-based, effective, and empirically validated treatment. Two follow-up studies with control groups found clinically and statistically significant reductions in symptoms of attachment disorder, aggression, anti-social behavior, thought disorders, attention problems, mood, and social relationship dysfunction. Over 80% of the children treated had previously been in treatment on three or more occasions, without any noticeable improvement. Treatment averaged 23 sessions over approximately ten months. (Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Child & Adolescent Social Work, vol. 23, pp.137-171, 2006)
SUGGESTED READING
You will find the following list of books helpful. It is strongly recommended that you read the first book before the workshop begins. This will ensure that everyone has a solid foundation of common knowledge.

1. Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy: Essential Methods & Practices, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Rowman, Lanham, MD, 2010.
2. The Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy Casebook, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Rowman: Lanham, MD, 2011.
3. Creating Capacity for Attachment, Eds., Arthur Becker-Weidman, Ph.D., Deborah Shell, MA, LCMHC, Wood ‘N’ Barnes, 2005/2008.
4. Attachment Parenting, Ed., Arthur Becker-Weidman & Deborah Shell, Rowman: Lanham, MD, 2010.
5. Attachment-Focused Family Therapy. Daniel Hughes, Norton, 2007.
6. Attachment-Focused Family Therapy Workbook, D. Hughes, Norton: NY, 2011.
7. Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research, and Clinical Applications. Edited by Jude Cassidy and Phillip Shaver. The Guilford Press, 2008.
8. Building the Bonds of Attachment. 2nd. Ed. Daniel Hughes, Ph.D., 2006
9. Attachment Across the Life Cycle. Edited by Colin Murray Parkes, Joan Stevenson-Hinde, and Peter Marris. Routledge, 1991.
10. A Secure Base. John Bowlby, Basic Books, NY, 1988.
11. John Bowlby & Attachment Theory. Jeremy Holmes, Routledge, NY, 1993.

PURPOSE OF WORKSHOP
This workshop is for therapists who want to learn how to treat trauma-attachment disordered children. Participants will learn effective therapy principals for helping traumatized children. Participants will learn:
1. Initial work to determine parent readiness.
2. The components of Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and the phases of treatment.
3. The differential use of components in different phases of treatment.
4. Effective therapeutic techniques to use with traumatized and attachment disordered children and their families.
5. Effective parenting principals.
Participants will have the opportunity to view videotapes of actual therapy sessions with traumatized children that demonstrate therapeutic principals and present their own video tapes or cases.

April 15, 2011 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, International Adoption, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Institutional Care, Adoption, and Delays in Exeuctive Function

Previous research has shown that children who have spent at least some part of their life in an institution tend to have problems with executive functions. Executive functions are higher brain functions such as working memory, the ability to inhibit one’s behavior, forward planning, the ability to move from one task to another, impulse control, the ability to start or initiate, and attention. Instruments such a the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function can be used to measure executive functions.

Past research has concentrated on children aged between six and eleven so researchers at the University of Pittsburgh studied 418 children who had been adopted from institutions in Russia where they had been psychologically, but not physically, deprived. 130 of the children were pre-school age while the rest were older. The study found that the older the age the children had been adopted at the worse their executive function was and that those who were adopted after they were 18 months old had worse executive function than those who had been adopted when they were younger. The onset of adolescence was associated with a greater increase in executive function deficits for children adopted after 18 months than for those adopted when they were younger.

Merz, E. C. and McCall, R. B. Parent ratings of executive functioning in children adopted from psychosocially depriving institutions Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry doi: 10.1111/j.1469-7610.2010.02335.x

A study using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales found similar delays, lags, and problems among a group of adopted children.
Becker-Weidman, A., (2009) “Effects of Early Maltreatment on Development: A Descriptive study using the Vineland,” Child Welfare, 88 (2)137-161.
Also see The Center For Family Development for very useful information.

November 12, 2010 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, IEP, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Wiki: Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy

There is a new Wiki devoted to Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy that readers may want to view.
Click on this link to get there.

The url is: http://dyadicdevelopmentalpsychotherapy.wikia.com/wiki/Dyadic_Developmental_Psychotherapy_Wiki

The Wiki has just started, but already has many articles about Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy and related topics that readers will find quite useful and interesting.

September 4, 2010 Posted by | Adoption, Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, IEP, International Adoption, Legal Issues, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ADHD and Internationally Adopted Children

There is a very interesting and informative study in the most recent issue of the European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry titled, ADHD in international adoptees: a national cohort study The abstract is summarized below:

Several investigators have reported an increased frequency of attention/hyperactivity symptoms in internationally adopted children. In this national cohort study, the authors aimed to determine the prevalence of ADHD medication in international adoptees in Sweden, in comparison to the general population. A further purpose was to study gender, age at adoption and region of origin as predictors of ADHD medication in international adoptees. The study population consisted of all Swedish residents born in 1985–2000 with Swedish-born parents, divided into 16,134 adoptees, and a comparison population of 1,326,090. ADHD medications were identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register during 2006. Logistic regression was used to calculate the “odds ratios”.

The rates of ADHD medication were higher in international adoptees than in the comparison population for both boys (5.3 vs. 1.5% for 10–15-year olds) and girls (2.1 vs. 0.3% for 10–15-year olds). International adoptees from all regions of birth more often consumed ADHD medication compared with the majority population, but the age and sex adjusted odds ratios were particularly high for adoptees from Eastern Europe, Middle East/Africa and Latin America. Adjusting for maternal education and single parenthood increased the odds ratios even further. The risk also increased with higher age at adoption. Adoptees from Eastern Europe have a very high risk for ADHD medication. A structured identification and support programme should be tailored for this group. Adoptees from other regions have a more moderately increased risk, which should be communicated to adoptive parents and to professionals who care for adoptees in their clinical practice.

Of course it is still unclear whether the children actually had ADHD since attention difficulties and related “ADHD” symptoms can also be caused by sensory-integration dysfunction, trauma symptoms, Complex Trauma, attachment difficulties and disorders, and Bipolar disorder. The fact that the children from Eastern Europe had the highest rate of use of ADHD medication does suggest some environmental rather than a genetic cause for the attention problems; suggesting that the cause may lie with the effects of chronic early maltreatment on development (Complex Trauma)

December 20, 2009 Posted by | Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Evan B. Donaldson Institute picks up article

My article detailing the developmental lags of children with complex trauma and disorders of attachment was picked up and described on the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute’s Research Summary page.

http://www.adoptioninstitute.org/newsletter/2009_09.html#development

It is a good summary of the article.

October 6, 2009 Posted by | Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

ATTACh Conference

of Children’s annual conference, this year in San Antonio Texas. It was a wonderful conference for professionals, parents, and researchers. I had the pleasure of hearing Dr. Bruce Perry, a key note speaker, talk about the effects of trauma in childhood on later development. The mediating factor is the effects of trauma on brain development and brain function. This leads to an approach or sequencing of treatment that takes into account which systems of the brain are impaired. This was a very useful talk.

I strongly recommend that people consider the conference next year, in California. More information can be found at

October 1, 2009 Posted by | Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, IEP, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What I’ve learned training people from overseas

Recently a psychologist from the Czech Republic completed a month-long training program at The Center for Family Development. I’ve been reflecting on how training professionals from other countries here at the Center, and my travels training others overseas has affected my work I’ve trained professionals from any countries: Canada, Singapore, Australia, Bermuda, Finland, and the Czech Republic. Those of you who teach may have an experience similar to mine; that teaching keeps my thinking fresh, current, and in an ongoing process of development. Having to explain and demonstrate treatment principles causes me to think about my work and the work of others in a fresh and deep way. It also prods me to read and research. Training professionals from other nations who have a different culture, history, and language has enriched my work in a number of ways. It causes me to think about the differences in:
Child Welfare policies
Child Welfare practices
Effects of different experiences on child development
Universals
The meaning of symptoms
The meaning of words

Some examples of the differences I’ve noticed in child welfare policy and practice include the following. In the US many domestically adopted children receive a subsidy from the state. This is to encourage families to adopt since adoption is preferable to “permanent” foster care. Many other nations do not provide adoption subsidies and we find that their placement rates are much lower than in the US and the length of time children spend in care is much longer. The Czech Republic uses primarily institutional care for children and not foster care. In some countries the government places children only within their community (ethnic and religious).

My travels and training at the Center have led me to think much more precisely about language. For example, some concepts and words in our language are very difficult to translate into the other language, For example, the concept “Dyadic” in Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy cannot be translated into Finnish. I think much more precisely about language in my practice and I listen carefully to words and the many meanings of similar words. Words define and give meaning to experiences and define one’s reality. Different words lead to different meanings and different realities, even though the objective experiences may be the same in treatment now I focus a lot on the words families and children us and how that affects relationships for good and bad. For example, how often have you heard a child say, “I was bad,” instead of “I did something bad/wrong.” What a difference that represents. Or, “When I think about John and my kids,” versus “When I think about John and my other sons.” My work overseas as made me more open to ambiguity in language and to then explore that ambiguity (“What do you mean by xxxx,” or “Does that mean xxxx?”). I find that clarifying those ambiguities is helpful for development and healing. Discussing the meaning of events, experiences, and words with families and helping them discuss that among themselves seems to help increase their reflective function, empathy, and insightfulness.

August 19, 2009 Posted by | Arthur Becker-Weidman, Brain, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Evidence-based, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Effects of early maltreatment on development

An empirical study completed by me at the Center for Family Development has just been published in Child Welfare, which is the Journal for the Child Welfare League of America. The article is

Becker-Weidman, A., (2009). Effects of Early Maltreatment on Development: A Descriptive Study Using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II, 88(2) pp.137-161.

Children with histories of chronic early maltreatment within a care giving relationship may develop complex trauma or developmental trauma disorder and experience a variety of deficits in several domains. This study explored the effects of complex trauma on the development of 57 children, as measured by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-II. This is the first descriptive study to report on the significant discrepancies between chronological and developmental ages in adopted and foster children. This study found that adopted and foster children with a psychiatric diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder show developmental delays i the domains of communication, daily living skills, and socialization. The average adaptive behavior composite score for the children in this study yielded a developmental age (age equivalency) of 4.4 years, while the average chronological age was 9.9 years. The study describes the various delays in each domain and then discusses the implications for treatment and parenting, schools, child welfare policy, programs, and practices, and for further research.

August 7, 2009 Posted by | Arthur Becker-Weidman, Child Abuse, Child development, Child Welfare, Dr. Arthur Becker-Weidman, Dr. Becker-Weidman, Dyadic Developmental Psychotherapy, Education, Empirically supported, Evidence-based, IEP, Parenting, Psychology, Research, Special Education, Treatment, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment